Tutorials

CSS image filters are a quick way to tweak images in the browser without resorting to Photoshop. This simple reference gives you 9 CSS filter shorthands that provide an excellent way to maintain style consistency across visual content on your site, or just add a little fun to image hovers. CSS filters are most commonly used to adjust the display of images images and backgrounds, but can also be applied to other visual elements such as borders and buttons.

Inserting icon fonts to your layouts adds fun visual queues for your users and are especially successful as menu links or as replacements for larger graphics. Like standalone SVG files, they can be scaled losslessly and manipulated with CSS for easier customization. Icon fonts are normally displayed by including an icon font stylesheet, then inserting an HTML element where the icon should appear, such as <span class="icon123"> or <i class="xyz">, but using the HTML method is not always possible. This quick tip will show you how to add icon fonts to any element in your site safely with just CSS.

Hero headers or hero images are one of the most frequently used and aesthetically pleasing web deisgn trends in 2016, and will likely remain strong for a few years to come. The term "hero" is often interchanged with "jumbo" and refers to full-width graphics or photos seen at the top of a post or page, like you see on this one! There are several ways to use a hero image in web design, from full-screen backgrounds to simply adding visual impact to page content.

There are many Javascript fixes for the viewport height units bug in iOS 7 (iPhone & iPad), this article will cover how to resolve this bug with CSS. This particular bug affects the rendering of viewport height units, for example: if you try to make a full viewport height container with height:100vh, it will display a very tall empty gap. Although this bug was fixed in iOS 8, but many old iPhone and iPad users are still using the old iOS 7. The vh-unit buggyfill is one of the popular Javascript workarounds, but if you don’t want to rely on Javascript here is a quick CSS fix using media queries.

This tutorial will show you how to create an interactive map of the world you can use to display travel photos. In the process, you’ll be introduced to Raphael.js. It is a small JavaScript library that makes it easy to work with vector graphics. Instead of using HTML5 Canvas for interactive animations, it uses SVG (for modern browsers) and VML (for IE8 and earlier). This means that Raphael.js looks great on modern browsers and mobile devices, but degrades gracefully and is functional on legacy browsers. Because it is written in JavaScript, it’s very easy to integrate with other elements in the DOM. This makes it a great choice for all sorts of interactive animations and a useful tool to add to your skill set.

Note: this is a guest post by Chris Youderian.

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