WordPress

As requested by some attendees at the WordCamp Toronto 2009, I’ve uploaded my presentation slides: "Various Ways of Using WordPress." The slides can be downloaded at SlideShare and I’ve also embedded them in this post. If you missed the event, this post is a quick recap of my presentation. You will learn how I use WordPress to manage my sites: Web Designer Wall (blog), Best Web Gallery (gallery), and IconDock (eCommerce/blog). Get ready and learn more about WordPress theme coding.

I’m excited to announce that I will be speaking at WordCamp Toronto 2009. I will talk about various ways to use WordPress and provide tips on how I setup my WordPress sites (this site, Best Web Gallery, and IconDock). The event will take place in downtown Toronto between May 8 – 10, 2009. I have five tickets to giveaway. For your chance to win a free ticket, submit a comment in this post before May 4, 2009.

In the last two chapters, I talked about Installing WordPress Locally and Building Custom WordPress Theme. This chapter will cover exporting your local WordPress to a web host. Assume you are done with the local WordPress development, it is time to learn how to export and import WordPress. Then you can keep the local version for backup purpose and future development (ie. testing new themes, plugins, and upgrades).

This is the Chapter II of the Complete WordPress Theme Guide series. This chapter will show you how to build a custom WordPress theme. Although the Codex site provides very good documentations on how to create a theme, but I find it too complicated for a beginner. In this tutorial, I will explain the basics of how WordPress theme works and show you how to convert a static HTML template into a theme. No PHP skill is required, but you need Photoshop and CSS skills to create your own design.

This is the first chapter of the Complete WordPress Theme Guide series. In this chapter, you will learn how to install WordPress on a local computer. By doing so, it will save you time from updating and previewing files (so, you don’t have to frequently upload files on every change). You can also use the local version to test new plugins, themes, and upgrades. This tutorial is intended for beginners who want to learn how to run WordPress locally.

Based on a recent poll I’ve conducted, many readers are interested in learning how to build a custom WordPress theme. So, in upcoming posts on Web Designer Wall, I’m going to write a complete WordPress guide on how to install WordPress and customize theme. Below is a table of content of the guide (links will be updated as soon the posts are published):

Chapter 1: Installing WordPress Locally

Chapter 2: Building Custom WordPress Theme

Chapter 3: Moving and Exporting WordPress

There are several thousands of WordPress plugins in the WordPress community and new plugins are coming out everyday. However, not all plugins are useful, in fact some are very bad written that will mess up your site or harm your WordPress installation. So how do you know which plugins are right for you? Well, here is a list of plugins that I have used or played around before. Hopefully you will something useful here.

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7th Anniversary: 50% off all WordPress themes and plugins at Themify.