CSS

If you are the guy who uses <div> tag for everything, this post is for you. It focuses on how you can write clean HTML code by using semantic markups and minimize the use of <div> tag. Have you ever edited someone’s templates, don’t those messy tags drive you crazy? Not only writing clean templates can benefit yourself, but your team as well. It will save you time when you have to debug and edit (particularly the large projects).

This post is about 5 useful CSS properties that you should be very familiar with, but will most likely rarely use. I’m not talking about the new fancy CSS3 properties. I’m referring to the old CSS2 properties such as: clip, min-height, white-space, cursor, and display that are widely supported by all browsers. So, don’t miss this post because you might be surprised how useful they are.

Are you tired of your typical columned and boxed layout? It is time to learn how to break out of the box and do something creative. In this post, I’ve collected some of the best examples that are designed out of the box. I’ve also provided some quick CSS tips with demo files on how to break out of the box by creatively using background images and the CSS position property.

Usually, we create hover effects by changing: font color, font styles, border styles, background, and etc. But there are a lot more that we can do with hover. We can use hover to beautify design, minimize clutter, and display additional information. In this article, I’m going to provide various examples of websites that maximize the use of hover. Also, I will provide several quick tutorials on how to create different mouse hover effects. So, read on.

This is a quick CSS tutorial to show you how to create a menu list using either the CSS border style or a background image. The trick is to apply a bottom border to the <li> element, then use the absolute position property to shift the nested elements down to cover the border. It is very flexible — you can easily change the layout by altering the border or background image. It even works when the browser’s font size is being scaled (increased or decreased).

View Demo Menu Design

Guest Post By: Juul Coolen

The web, and consequently its visual appearance, is dynamic by nature. For one, browsers interpret pages and show them accordingly. In a standards-compliant world every browser would adhere to the standards as set out by the W3C so pages look the same in any browser, but we all know the actual state of affairs. Granted, things have significantly changed over the last couple of years. ‘Bad’ browsers are phasing out (albeit slowly), handing over control to the designers by means of CSS. Which doesn’t mean total control, though. Especially when (enviously) looking at the area of print, there is one facet in particular we would love to be able to borrow: typography in all its glory. Or the way Jeffrey Zeldman puts it:

"The less sophisticated lament on our behalf that we are stuck with ugly fonts."

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