CSS

There is no better time than the end of the year for some fresh inspiration! One of the most popular trends this year, features splitscreen layouts, lots of white space, clean typography and subtle effects. With this playful trend in mind, I’ve created a two-part tutorial to show you how to use flexbox, 3D transforms and Animate.css to create a delightful landing page for a fictional fashion brand.

Getting content to center perfectly within an element and then ensuring it responds properly at different screen sizes is one of the biggest challenges that still face front-end designers. It is not that it is difficult, but because there are several ways to go about it, figuring out which method is best can be confusing. Many CSS vertical centering methods force you to write even more code to solve problems the rules create elsewhere, or need media queries to get it to work well at all screen sizes. Understanding how each method works differently and is affected by things like the HTML, browser default style rules and screen size will help you make better decisions and write better code in the long run.

The temptation to dive right into new and exciting CSS tricks is strong – you might even do it without knowing it through learning by example or implementing that hot new framework everyone is talking about. It is more important to fully understand new CSS classes and properties, experiment with them and learn their limitations before putting them into practice, especially when working on commercial projects. In this article I’ll cover some common CSS mishaps and pitfalls of newer techniques to help you make informed decisions when building your stylesheets.

CSS image filters are a quick way to tweak images in the browser without resorting to Photoshop. This simple reference gives you 9 CSS filter shorthands that provide an excellent way to maintain style consistency across visual content on your site, or just add a little fun to image hovers. CSS filters are most commonly used to adjust the display of images images and backgrounds, but can also be applied to other visual elements such as borders and buttons.

Inserting icon fonts to your layouts adds fun visual queues for your users and are especially successful as menu links or as replacements for larger graphics. Like standalone SVG files, they can be scaled losslessly and manipulated with CSS for easier customization. Icon fonts are normally displayed by including an icon font stylesheet, then inserting an HTML element where the icon should appear, such as <span class="icon123"> or <i class="xyz">, but using the HTML method is not always possible. This quick tip will show you how to add icon fonts to any element in your site safely with just CSS.

Hero headers or hero images are one of the most frequently used and aesthetically pleasing web design trends in 2016, and will likely remain strong for a few years to come. The term “hero” is often interchanged with “jumbo” and refers to full-width graphics or photos seen at the top of a post or page, like you see in?this one! There are several ways to use a hero image in web design, from full-screen backgrounds to simply adding visual element?to the page’s content.

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