CSS flexbox is an incredibly useful tool for layout without using floats or positioning. Currently almost all current browser version support flexbox, making it a go-to standard for web design. It can solve a number of problems efficiently, such as vertical alignment, space distribution, ordering of elements and sizing. It offers more freedom to arrange the content of a page depending on the size of the viewport, achieving an inherently responsive layout with only a few CSS rules and a simple HTML structure. This guide focuses on the primary properties as they relate to the layout process and demonstrates visually how they work, rather than summarizing with no context or going into too much technical detail. Use it as a cheat-sheet to quickly master CSS flexbox using shorthand properties and only the most common values.

When Spotify launched their colorful new brand identity, featuring hip duo-toned imagery, it went hand-in-hand with a new Colorizer tool that allows artists to apply a variety of filters to images. This solved a problem in which Spotify needed a way to present the thousands of images uploaded, all with a different look and feel, in a way that keeps them uniform with the brand. This is one of the most common problems facing web design, especially when the app or website content is outside the control of a full-time art director. This tutorial will show you how to use pure CSS to achieve a wide variety of Spotify colorizer effects that can be applied to any image.

Last week I demonstrated how to build a split-screen website layout using CSS flexbox and viewport units that offers an alternative way to present a brand’s featured content. Clicking on one side or the other navigates further into the site without a page load, using CSS transitions and 3d transforms. This week, I’ll show you how to use these same techniques to add animation and movement to the content and buttons.

All websites are somewhat interactive…we click on links or scroll a page, but truly interactive websites take us on a user-driven adventure or draws us in through motion and sound while giving us the power of choice. Interaction can be as simple as a series of clicks that navigate us through a story or landscape, or as complex as moving through a 3D environment to discover hidden content or reach goals to move to the next step. Put simply, interactivity is creating a user experience where the visitor is placed at the center.

There is no better time than the end of the year for some fresh inspiration! One of the most popular trends this year, features splitscreen layouts, lots of white space, clean typography and subtle effects. With this playful trend in mind, I’ve created a two-part tutorial to show you how to use flexbox, 3D transforms and Animate.css to create a delightful landing page for a fictional fashion brand.

The year ahead should be a really exciting one for design, with the introduction of wider support for SVG and a host of new things we can do with CSS as CSS4 gains broader acceptance. In taking a look back at what made a big splash this year, I hope you will be inspired to kick off 2017 with some fresh ideas and new inspiration as we look at design trends in 2016 and what to expect in 2017.

Getting content to center perfectly within an element and then ensuring it responds properly at different screen sizes is one of the biggest challenges that still face front-end designers. It is not that it is difficult, but because there are several ways to go about it, figuring out which method is best can be confusing. Many CSS vertical centering methods force you to write even more code to solve problems the rules create elsewhere, or need media queries to get it to work well at all screen sizes. Understanding how each method works differently and is affected by things like the HTML, browser default style rules and screen size will help you make better decisions and write better code in the long run.

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